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Discussion Starter #1
A few weeks ago I installed my new Works Performance shocks that I ordered for my Grizzly 660. I was hoping to cure it's one major flaw, which is being on the tippy side. I always suspected the problem was due to too little compression damping in the shocks, and also not enough spring.

So I bent over and ordered up a set of four of their "ARS" models, which give you, in addition to adjustable preload, a lever that lets you select one of four spring rates. Oh, and you also gain about 1" of suspension travel at each corner with the new shocks.

Today I finally had the time and motivation to go for a ride to see how they work. I was worried that they'd be stiff and harsh, but I was very wrong! With the ARS lever in the softest position, they feel exactly like the original shocks, except that they're better damped. After a while, I moved the lever to the next stiffest setting. It's still VERY comfy, but feels more like my Rincon. It's still more plush, though.

In all, these are fantastic shocks! I think they will eliminate the tippiness almost entirely.

Now if I can figure out how to fix the steering. Part of it may be the tires... I'll know better once my Maxxis Bighorns arrive in another week or so (the wheels are on backorder). I think I may put the ATRs from the Rincon on it for a ride to see what difference that makes.

I also think that, at 3000+ miles, I may be due for a front-end rebuild. All new balljoints and yet another set of tie-rods. Tie rods are cheap... $7 each. But the balljoints are $40-50 each, and I'll need four per side (two for the control arms, two for the tie rods). There's a knock in the steering that I feel when the suspension unloads, sorta like something "tapping" on the steering column.

This machine still rocks!

Rob
 

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My machine takes a very active rider to move from side to side to counter any tippiness beforehand. The extra advantage of this is that I'm in a good position to jump off, if the machine is bound and determined to peel itself off the earth. I'm no yardstick, as I'm just learning, but do update us (all 6 of us) on the tippiness of the machine with the new shocks.

This 2nd post of mine will make me the most prolific poster in this forum, even beating out the site administrator. HooRah!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Have you cranked down on the preloads yet? I found that increasing mine to 3 in front and 4 in back helped a lot for stability (on the old shocks that is).

Also, give serious consideration to removing the rear swaybar. You only lose a slight amount of stability on the trails at speed, and it's something you learn how to work with... but what you gain in stability in off-camber situations is well worth it.

Rob
 

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I have always been curious as to how a good set of aftermarket shocks would affect the Grizzly 660. How do the works perform in rough ,rocky terrian? Have you tried off cambers with new shocks and sway bar on? And last but not least....:) does the overall ride and performance justafiy spending the BIG BUCKS?
My wife and I both ride yamahas,2000 Kodiak and 2002 Grizzly.Both quads seem to feel tippy on off-cambers. What do you guys think about wheel spacers (wider stance)...am curious as to wheather this would help solve tippiness in the Yamahas.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I haven't had enough experience with them yet to give a good report, but I can say that they are way nicer than the stockers. The ride quality has improved, which I didn't think was possible (the Grizz has always been the most plus ATV I've ever ridden, and I've ridden a lot of them).

It's definitely helped in off-camber situations, especially since the ARS lever allows you to limit the shock travel, which is what I've felt is the problem all along -- the shocks compress too easily, adding to the tippiness.

I don't plan to put the swaybar back on so I can't comment on that, but I do think it's a good idea to take it off. It really does help it be more stable.

Rob
 

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When you guys say tippiness, do you mean sway? Sway is the tendency of the chassis to roll toward the outside of a curve at speed. The combination of an independent suspension (IRS), and a high center of gravity would tend to cause this. When the Jeep was being developed, they gave up on an independent suspension because of the tendency to roll. This is why the anti-sway bar was developed, in an attempt to limit the amount of roll to a minimum. Removing the rear anti-sway bar on the back of the Grizzly would be a bad move because it would increase the posibility of roll-over in a curve at speed. The only reason that I can think of for removing the thing would be an attempt to improve rock crawling performance by allowing more independent movement of each rear wheel. I personally like to gas it in the curves, and get the rear wheels hung out a little bit, while keeping my weight as low and to the inside as possible. I would like to hear more from Rob about his new shocks. Is the improvement worth the thousand dollar cost?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Believe it or not, removing the rear swaybar makes only a SMALL difference in handling at speed.

But by tippiness, I'm not talking about curves at speed... I'm talking about the machine feeling like it may want to tip over during off-camber maneuvers, such as rock crawling or dealing with large ruts and stuff.

My observations have indicated that the stock shocks compress too easily (not enough compression damping) and too much in these situations, which only makes matters worse. The new shocks have much better damping, AND the ARS lever allows you to actually limit shock travel and change the spring rate to help aleviate this problem.

I paid around $700 for the shocks. For that money, I believe they're worth it. However, their price may have gone up since I got 'em. BUT also, I have over 3000 miles on my quad and by then the stock shocks were toast anyway, so I figured it was money well spent.

For 2004, I believe that Yamaha reworked the shock valving so some of these problems may have been cured. I won't know until more people have them and we can compare notes.

Rob
 

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Does Works Performance have a web site that shows these shocks, or other available shocks for the Grizzly?

Have you folks tried increasing the track width of your Grizzlys to decrease tippyness? I found that a set of C-series wheels and 27" Radial Outlaw tires really improved the overall feel of my Grizzly on off-cambers.


'03 Rincon - Holeshot ATRs; Dynojet kit; K&N; full HMF exhaust.

'04 Grizzly - 27" Outlaw Radials; C-Series wheels; Warn 2500.
 

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i´m thinking of putting on ASA shocks, i dont think u hurd of them, its a guy that designed them form my home town.

they dont have any springs at all its "only" a shock.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So it's basically an air shock. FOX has a shock like that out now for ATVs too... it's the FOX Float. They're expensive... about $900 per pair.

They're supposed to be nice and lightweight, but from what I've heard, they're kinda stuff on the compression side.

Rob
 

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no its not just an air shock, its only the ones thas manifacture them that knows how they look inside.

hes taking patent of the construktion.

what i ckow is that its only 2 moving parts in it one is the piston the other one is ??? but the thin with them is that u can use the same shock on a car or a bicykle if u whant its just to set the compression and rebound.

and its nut up for sale but hes trying to get asmany shocks out, so they r tested IRL, so im going to leav my ATV to him so he can mount them.
And then its just to sign a kontract that says that im not allowed to open them or sell them!
 
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